“The moon, like a flower, in heaven's high bower, with silent delight, sits and smiles on the night.”

I took a short walk tonight – it was a beautiful night despite the humid and voggy conditions we’ve been having lately. I could not help but notice the Hua moon, full and bright. Well, Saturday is the night of Hoku (full moon), an important time for many activities, including planting of lāʻau, and so here is some moon-related info.

Maoliworld resources
Kaulana Mahina, Maoliworld Group, created by Aunty Kalei
Lunar phases, video of Kalei (Tshua) Nuʻuhiwa, courtesy of Noʻeau, 2009
The Native Hawaiian Moon Calendar, blog post by Jon Ching, 2008
ʻIke Mahina, forum topic created by ʻOhukaniʻōhiʻa, 2008

Other sources of info regarding kaulana mahina
The Jhamandas Watumull Planetarium, Bishop Museum
The Hawaiian Moon Calendar, Hina Adventures
Lunar Days, KCC
Hawaiian Antiquities, David Malo, PDF, courtesy of Bishop Museum; widely available on the internet (Google Books, etc.) if you don't want to download a PDF
Hawaiian nights of the moon, a chapter from Maori Division of Time

Email requests for very informative newsletters courtesy of Kalei (Tsuha) Nuʻuhiwa to hawaiianmooncalendar@yahoo.com

News articles
Connecting with the past, INPEACE perpetuates Hawaiian culture through outdoor classrooms, Honolulu Advertiser, 2008
Hawaiian moon calendar, article by Paul Wood in Maui Magazine, 2006
Hawaiian way is to let moon guide planting, article by Duane Choy, Honolulu Advertiser, 2005

NASA
The Lunar Science Forum, July 21 – 23, 2009
Picture of the century, Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project Update
“The Moon”, Lunar and Planetary Science Program

What is your experience with gardening by moon cycles? Feel free to also join us on our group page to share your stories and insight.

What the heck is a "bower" and who said that quote?
A bower is a "shady leafy shelter in a wood or garden", and it was William Blake (1757 – 1827) in the poem "Night"

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For those in the UH Mānoa lāʻau lapʻau classes, don't forget to review your planting notes for the final on Thursday! The resources above will help you further your knowledge of best planting times.
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Comment by Miliaulani on May 11, 2009 at 9:31pm
Mahalo for the link to 'Ohu's post. I ended up planting u'ala on the night of Hoku, which according to his post, says root plants will be prolific. I will let you know the outcome. It was the first time I planted by the light of the moon. I agree w/ 'Ohu that we need to become more in tune with the lunar phases and observant of how it affects all other life cycles. It goes back to being closer to the land, less couped up inside with lights and distractions of modern living (t.v., computers, ipods, etc...)

Malama pono.
Comment by Ka ‘Ahahui Lā‘au Lapa‘au on May 11, 2009 at 8:30pm
Aloha Miliailani,

Mahalo for your comment - I envy your garden! - I have only a small lanai, but I grow what I can. ALL is also looking to get some mala started - perhaps on UH and elsewhere in the community - definitely in some schools. Food sovereignty is so important to increase the sustainability of our islands and to reconnect with our food and the natural world. The food can be cheaper (esp if you grow it), or as you mention, it can even a source of income for some. It seems like we are becoming more aware of that. Oahu also has lots of ag classes, local markets, community gardens - but there is still much work to do.
I too am worried about how much "official" support there is for GMO, and how many of the details are kept from the public. Hopefully as we realize that food sovereignty is important, our communities will fight to keep what ag land we have left for local sustainable farmers, rather than hand it over to GMO companies. We can hope, and do what we can to support these farmers...

As for the 'uala, I personally don't have any experience (although I recently obtained two slips, so I need to learn more), and I found some conflicting info. But, I think that ʻOhukaniʻōhiʻa's post would be most helpful.

Happy belated mother's day to all the moms in your 'ohana :).
Comment by Miliaulani on May 8, 2009 at 12:21am
I have my Hawaiian variety of u'ala in pots ready to go in the ground. I was going to plant in the moon tonight but got caught up w/ other things tonight so I will plant this weekend. Was it Hua or Hoku the night for planting underground tubers? Anyways, we just prepped our garden, 20'x40', with organic compost and fertilizer (seabird guano). Planted some herbs (basil, chives, green onions, regular onions), lettuce, tomato, chili pepper & papaya (Non-GMO Sunrise variety). Our avocado tree that we planted last year is about 10' high. Next want to plant some mai'a. There is nothing like getting your hands dirty in the rich soil and watching your seeds germinate and sprout. It is called food sovereignty....an ever important issue w/ the proliferation of gmo crops coming online in Hawaii. Just last week, Gay & Robinson, the last Sugar Plantation on Kaua'i to phase out of the sugar business, announced a deal to lease 3400 acres of land in Makaweli to DowAgroSciences to grow gmo corn crop. Already Syngenta and Pioneer dominate the landscape from Lihue to Mana, leasing land from major land owners including the state. There is an ever-growing movement on Kaua'i towards food sustainability and support of local agriculture (da kine you can eat). Gardening classes are being offered at Kauai Community Classes and a community garden is in place where you have to work so many hours a week. This to counter-act the industrial ag complex that is infiltrating Hawaii and taking over available ag land. Get back to the basics of home gardening and becoming less dependent on imported food. Lucky to have Farmers Markets almost every day of the week on Kaua'i, where I buy most of my produce. At least until our garden starts producing. Lately I have noticed quite a bit of roadside vendors selling their home grown fruits & vegetables...people are turning to this as a means of making money in these tough economic times. Gotta do what we gotta do to survive.

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