please kokua ia'u - writing an essay for an Asian/Pacific/American Studies anthology

I am writing an essay for an anthology on APA studies for Arizona State University - my first submission to an academic journal. With the rise of young people in the independence movement today (e.g. many of you on Ke A'o Maoli!), I felt it was important to document it and spread the word across the continent that this is happening.

I would like to interview college students, grads, educators, activists, organizers, who are active and want to contribute to this essay. Here's the abstract - please feel free to add your mana'o!

For years, activist groups and concerned individuals have rallied the Hawaiian community around the push for self-determination. Sovereignty remains a prevailing issue on the minds of many Hawaiians, including many young people who are upset and dissatisfied with Western ideology. In the age of new thinkers and contributors to the cause, however, the radical and fractured nature of the movement has left many young Hawaiians disconnected. I explore how this generation, utilizing their education to create systemic change, will build on the sovereignty movement to influence the future of the next.

This essay examines the particular role of young college-educated Native Hawaiians in reshaping and redefining the Hawaiian sovereignty movement. New data from financial aid and college support programs for Native Hawaiians, as well as enrollment figures from Hawai’i and mainland universities will allow exploration of the growth of the number of Hawaiians obtaining higher-education degrees and entering the public and non-profit sectors. Interviews with young working professionals, college professors, language teachers, and educators will reflect this data, and also serve to highlight the extent to which young educated Hawaiians are contributing to the theories and arguments that support the sovereignty movement, building on the lessons learned from previous generations of activists.

Examining the writing and organizing efforts by long-standing Native Hawaiian activists such as Haunani-Kay Trask, Kekuni Blaisdell, and others, the paper will attempt to shed light on their contributions and successes as well as take a look at the gaps in organizing and mobilizing young people in the movement. Tying in current legal issues such as the Akaka Bill and anti-affirmative action cases will bring us into modern-day issues surrounding self-determination and the ripple-impact these decisions will have on the ways that the movement can and will proceed in the hands of new leaders and thinkers.

The paper will reflect on useful theories and literature for indigenous activism and essentially lay the framework for thinking about how higher education and young people's power to create systemic change in government are at the center of the movement for Native Hawaiian sovereignty.

SHARE -- ANY KOKUA IS APPRECIATED.... LET'S EDUCATE! WE ARE HERE, LOUD AND PROUD! Ku'e, kanaka, ku'e!!! Eo.............

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Comment by Ululani on April 11, 2009 at 6:12am
I also want to add the following people which is not an inclusive list and is not meant to be inclusive as there are many out there who DO things every day yet are not always "recognized" for what they do to contribute:

HinaleimoanaFalemei: http://www.maoliworld.com/profile/HinaleimoanaFalemei

Cathy http://www.maoliworld.com/profile/Cathy (She does not use her full name here so I'm not reposting her full name.)

Liana Iaea Honda: http://www.maoliworld.com/profile/LianaHonda

Alice Namakaeha: http://www.maoliworld.com/profile/Namakaeha

Hale Mawae: http://www.maoliworld.com/profile/EoLono

Pono Kealoha: http://www.maoliworld.com/profile/Ponosize


He is similar in age to my father so I am including him here since he is not quite "older" yet is still "young:" http://www.maoliworld.com/profile/Tane

Just to name a few.

* The disappearance of a name does not necessarily mean that I didn't want to mention someone and/or their contribution(s.) Some people do not like it when I mention their names so I didn't add it.

Malama, Lana
Comment by Ku'ulani Miyashiro on April 10, 2009 at 5:47pm
Mahalo nui, I really appreciate all this mana'o. Lana - I completely understand your point! This is why I wanted feedback, so I could make sure my wording was not misleading or missing anything. It's important to distinguish, as you said, that we are not "the center" of it all, but rather we are continuing the legacy of resistance and standing up for what's pono, which has been passed down to us by our kupuna, who continue to guide us. I agree! It shouldn't pit generations against each other, but rather highlight what is being done now to push the movement (built up by our kupuna) forward. Mahalo for enlightening me. I will respond to the other comments in messages. Mahalo nui! Keep the mana'o coming.

Me ka ha'aha'a,
Ku'ulani
Comment by Ululani on April 10, 2009 at 5:32pm
Aloha kaua e Ku'ulani but it's obvious that the focus seems to be on the more "educated" Hawaiians and that you want their input but there are some key words that were posted that seem to try to negate what our kupuna have done. A few examples:


"This essay examines the particular role of young college-educated Native Hawaiians in reshaping and redefining the Hawaiian sovereignty movement. New data from financial aid and college support programs for Native Hawaiians, as well as enrollment figures from Hawai’i and mainland universities will allow exploration of the growth of the number of Hawaiians obtaining higher-education degrees and entering the public and non-profit sectors. Interviews with young working professionals, college professors, language teachers, and educators will reflect this data, and also serve to highlight the extent to which young educated Hawaiians are contributing to the theories and arguments that support the sovereignty movement, building on the lessons learned from previous generations of activists.

Tying in current legal issues such as the Akaka Bill and anti-affirmative action cases will bring us into modern-day issues surrounding self-determination and the ripple-impact these decisions will have on the ways that the movement can and will proceed in the hands of new leaders and thinkers.

The paper will reflect on useful theories and literature for indigenous activism and essentially lay the framework for thinking about how higher education and young people's power to create systemic change in government are at the center of the movement for Native Hawaiian sovereignty.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

An implication is that we colleged educated, professionals, "educated" Hawaiians are making a difference while our kupuna have not. Personally I do not like that message. LIke Toni has already mentioned... being rude to you is uncalled for and totally out of line. It's not necessary to be harsh towards you about your research.

However an implication is that we "educated" Hawaiians are at the center and that we are the ones who will "do it." For some whether colleged-educated or not the center is our kupuna. They have laid the foundation for everyone to build upon so in a way your words seem to imply that it's Generation X and Generation Y who will do it. Kala mai but some Hawaiians may take issue with that.

I would not be as rude about it though but I can understand why Gora may have reacted that way because it seems to imply that Generation X and Generation Y "educated" Hawaiians are the center. However... we are not.

I wish you luck in your endeavors. Hope that other "educated" Hawaiians respond.

Malama, Lana
Comment by Namaka'eha on April 10, 2009 at 4:57pm
What a drama, therefore if you need kokua, shoot me an email via inbox. I would love to participate!
Comment by Kaapuikinaea on April 10, 2009 at 1:37pm
e kuulani...yes, just ignore that "Hwnwahine surfchic", she's a psycho that one & always attack people here on MW b/c she think we owe her everything.
Comment by Ku'ulani Miyashiro on April 10, 2009 at 11:17am
hwnwahine, i appreciate your comment but maybe you misunderstood what my focus is? i'm not in support of the akaka bill or anti-affirmative action if that's what you thought. rather, what i'm saying is that this generation of kanaka maoli is very active in pushing the movement forward in SPITE of the legal obstacles that are arising. i am trying to highlight what young educated Hawaiians are doing, not trying to usurp what our kupuna laid as the foundation for our work. does that make sense?

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