Celebrating Hawaiian Independence Day - A Chronological History Compiled by Amelia Gora (2017)

                  Hawaiian Independence Day - a Chronological History 

                                                            Compiled by Amelia Gora (2017)

The following shows evidence of the Recognition of the Hawaiian Kingdom from 1842 to present day:

1842 and 1843 -

Important - Keep for your Records: The United States of America Recognized the Hawaiian Kingdom on December 19, 1842; Great Britain recognized the Hawaiian Kingdom on April 1, 1843; and France recognized the Hawaiian Kingdom on 

November 8, 1843.

Polynesian. (Honolulu [Oahu], Hawaii) 1844-1864, July 20, 1844, Image 1

Image provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015408/1844-07-20/ed-1/s...

Page

1884 -

The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, December 03, 1884, Image 11

Image provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1884-12-03/ed-1/s...

Page  

1885 -

The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, June 13, 1885, Image 3

Image provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1885-06-13/ed-1/s...

Page  

The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, November 24, 1885, Image 3

Image provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1885-11-24/ed-1/s...

Page  

1889 -

The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, November 28, 1889, Image 2

Image provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1889-11-28/ed-1/s...

Page  

The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, December 03, 1889, Page 2, Image 2

Image provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1889-12-03/ed-1/s...

Page


 

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2003

Hawaiian Independence Day - La Ku'oko'a

Nov 24, 2003 - This Friday, 28 November is La Ku`oko`a, Hawai`i Independence Day. It marked the day in 1843 that the treaties of international recognition were signed in London.

 

 

2004 - 2009:

UNPO: Ka Lahui: Hawaiian Independence Day

Nov 29, 2004 - November 28 was thereafter established as an official national holiday to celebrate the recognition of Hawaii's independence. ... After an attempted counterrevolution in 1895, the oligarchy announced that November 28, 1895 -- a Thursday -- would not be celebrated as La Ku'oko'a.

Although this is 116 years that world countries recognized the Kingdom of Hawai'i formally, we are celebrating its 200th year as a unified Hawaiian Kingdom as well. This article was written in 2004. Puanani sent it out as a reminde; so here it is:

In the Kingdom of Hawaii, November 28 was an official holiday called Ka La Kuokoa, or Independence Day. This was the day in 1843 when England and France formally recognized Hawaii's independence.

Faced with the problem of foreign encroachment of Hawaiian territory, His Hawaiian Majesty King Kamehameha III deemed it prudent and necessary to dispatch a Hawaiian delegation to the United States and then to Europe with the power to settle alleged difficulties with nations, negotiate treaties and to ultimately secure the recognition of Hawaiian Independence by the major powers of the world. In accordance with this view, Timoteo Ha'alilio, William Richards and Sir George Simpson were commissioned as joint Ministers Plenipotentiary on April 8, 1842. Sir George Simpson, shortly thereafter, left for England, via Alaska and Siberia, while Mr. Ha'alilio and Mr. Richards departed for the United States, via Mexico, on July 8, 1842.

The Hawaiian delegation, while in the United States of America, secured the assurance of U.S. President Tyler on December 19, 1842 of its recognition of Hawaiian independence, and then proceeded to meet Sir George Simpson in Europe and secure formal recognition by Great Britain and France. On March 17, 1843, King Louis-Phillipe of France recognizes Hawaiian independence at the urging of King Leopold of Belgium, and on April 1, 1843, Lord Aberdeen on behalf of Her Britannic Majesty Queen Victoria, assured the Hawaiian delegation that:

"Her Majesty's Government was willing and had determined to recognize the independence of the Sandwich Islands under their present sovereign."

On November 28, 1843, at the Court of London, the British and French Governments entered into a formal agreement of the recognition of Hawaiian independence, with what is called the Anglo-Franco proclamation:

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and His Majesty the King of the French, taking into consideration the existence in the Sandwich Islands (Hawaiian Islands) of a government capable of providing for the regularity of its relations with foreign nations, have thought it right to engage, reciprocally, to consider the Sandwich Islands as an Independent State, and never to take possession, neither directly or under the title of Protectorate, or under any other form, of any part of the territory of which they are composed.

November 28 was thereafter established as an official national holiday to celebrate the recognition of Hawaii's independence.

As a result of this recognition, the Hawaiian Kingdom entered into treaties with the major nations of the world and had established over ninety legations and consulates in multiple seaports and cities.

But in 1893, an illegal intervention into Hawaii's affairs by the U.S. resulted in a "fake revolution" against the legitimate Hawaiian government, and a puppet oligarchy set itself up with its main purpose being Hawaii's annexation to the United States. After an attempted counterrevolution in 1895, the oligarchy announced that November 28, 1895 -- a Thursday -- would not be celebrated as La Ku'oko'a. The American holiday Thanksgiving would become the official national holiday instead. Holidays are of course important aspects of a collective national identity, particularly a holiday like Independence Day, and this was essentially a way to cover up and try to destroy the history and identity of the Hawaiian national population.

At first Hawaiians protested and celebrated Ka La Ku'oko'a anyway, telling the story of the national heroes who had travelled to Europe to secure Hawaii's recognition. But over time, this history - knowledge of the holiday and how it was replaced - was almost lost, until Hawaiian language scholars in the last few years started translating Hawaiian language newspapers and uncovered the history.

Recently there has been a renewed effort to revive the celebration of Nov. 28 as Ka La Ku'oko'a - Hawaiian Independence Day, to remember that Hawaii was a fully recognized member of the world family of nations, and that's its independence is still intact under prolonged illegal occupation.

Pua

nani Rogers

2008 -

In the Kingdom of Hawai`i November 28 was an official holiday called Ka La Ku`oko`a, or Independence Day. This was the day in 1843 when England and France formally recognized Hawai`i's independence.

His Hawaiian Majesty King Kamehameha III deemed it prudent and necessary to dispatch a Hawaiian delegation to the United States and then to Europe with the power to negotiate treaties and to ultimately secure the recognition of Hawaiian Independence by the major powers of the world.
The Hawaiian delegation, while in the United States of America, secured the assurance of U.S. President Tyler on December 19, 1842 of its recognition of Hawaiian independence, and then proceeded to meet Sir George Simpson in Europe and secure formal recognition by Great Britain and France.As a result of this recognition, the Hawaiian Kingdom entered into treaties with the major nations of the world and had established over ninety legations and consulates in multiple seaports and cities.

November 28 was thereafter established as an official national holiday to celebrate the recognition of Hawai`i's independence.


But in 1893, an illegal intervention into Hawai`i's affairs by the U.S. resulted in a "fake revolution" against the legitimate Hawaiian government, and a puppet oligarchy set itself up with its main purpose being Hawai`i's annexation to the United States.
Hawaiians protested and celebrated Ka La Ku`oko`a anyway, telling the story of the national heroes who had traveled to Europe to secure Hawai`i's recognition.

We celebrate
 Ka La Ku`oko`a
 - Hawaiian Independence Day to remember that Hawai`i was a fully recognized member of the world family of nations, and its independence is still intact under prolonged illegal occupation.

Independence Day, La Ku'oko'a: Nov. 28

By Keanu Sai / Special to Ka Wai Ola

In 1842, Kamehameha III had a "very strong desire that his Kingdom shall be formally acknowledged by the civilized nations of the world as a sovereign and independent State." To accomplish this, he appointed Timoteo Ha'alilio, William Richards and Sir George Simpson, a British subject, as joint ministers plenipotentiary on April 8, 1842. Shortly thereafter, Simpson left for England, via Alaska and Siberia, while Ha'alilio and Richards departed for the United States, via Mexico, on July 8, 1842.

After Ha'alilio and Richards secured President John Tyler's assurance of recognizing Hawaiian independence on Dec. 19, 1842, the delegation proceeded to meet Simpson in Europe. On March 17, 1843, King Louis-Philippe assures them of France's recognition of Hawaiian independence, and on April 1, 1843, Lord Aberdeen, on behalf of Queen Victoria, assured the Hawaiian delegation that "Her Majesty's Government was willing and had determined to recognize the independence of the Sandwich Islands under their present sovereign." Confirming these assurances, Great Britain and France formally recognized Hawaiian sovereignty on Nov. 28, 1843, by joint proclamation at the Court of London, and the United States followed on July 6, 1844, by letter of Secretary of State J.C. Calhoun. Nov. 28 was a national holiday celebrating Hawaiian Independence, La Ku'oko'a.

On May 16, 1854, Kamehameha III proclaimed the Hawaiian Kingdom to be a neutral State, and it was expressly stated in treaties with Sweden-Norway in 1852 and Spain in 1863. As an internationally recognized sovereign and neutral state, the Hawaiian Kingdom joined the Universal Postal Union on Jan. 1, 1882, (today an agency of the United Nations) maintained more than 90 legations (embassies) and consulates throughout the world, and entered into extensive diplomatic and treaty relations with Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bremen, Chili, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Guatemala, Hamburg, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Samoa, Spain, Sweden-Norway, Switzerland, the United States and Uruguay.

The year 1893 was to have been a festive year celebrating the 50th anniversary of Hawaiian independence. Instead, it was a year that the United States began to systematically violate Hawaiian sovereignty that resulted in the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian government and the prolonged occupation of the country since the Spanish-American War. Nevertheless, Nov. 28 was and still remains a national holiday.

Keanu Sai

Keanu Sai is completing his Ph.D. in political science at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, specializing in Public Law and International Relations. His dissertation is titled The American Occupation of the Hawaiian Kingdom: Beginning the Transition from Occupied to Restored State. You can visit his website for more information at www.hawaiiankingdom.org


 

2010 -

Added by Pono Kealoha at 11:48am on November 30, 2010

Video: La Ku'oko'a 11-28-2010

mber and commemorate the life and work of Timoteo Ha`alilio, a national hero, and to highlight the relationship of this Hawaiian Ali`i and Ambassador to His Majesty, King Kamehameha III." The original celebration of Hawaii's independence took place during the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1843, after England and France recognized Hawaii as a member of the European family of nations, and as an independent country equal to England, France, and the United States. The day continued to be an annual celebration from about 1844 to 1895, and for some years afterward, unofficially. La Ku`oko`a marks the day, November 28, 1843, that the Ali`i Timoteo Ha`alilio, sent as part of an envoy by King Kamehameha III, succeeded in obtaining the signatures of the authorities of Great Britain and France on a treaty recognizing Hawai`i as a sovereign nation. Ha`alilio, with the missionary William Richards along as his secretary, traveled through Mexico on foot and donkey to Washington D.C., where they met President John Tyler. Ha`alilio and Richards, armed with his agreement, then went on to Europe, to Belgium, Paris, and London, where the treaty was finally signed. They returned to the United States to cement U.S. agreement. On the journey home Ke Ali`i Timoteo Ha`alilio died, on December 3, 1844. The Treaty of Independence was a substantial achievement under international law, recognized by the government of the Kingdom through the official celebration of La Ku`oko`a. After the overthrow in 1893, the so-called Republic of Hawai`i government announced that November 28, 1895-a Thursday-would no longer be celebrated as La Ku`oko`a. Instead, Thanksgiving would become the official national holiday. The po`e aloha `aina-the thousands of Kanaka Maoli opposed to the illegal haole government-were incensed. They ignored the government's orders, and continued to hold celebrations of La Ku`oko`a. At those gatherings, they told the story of Ha`alilio's journey and significant achievement. James Kaulia of the Hui Aloha `Aina said that "the Kanaka Maoli recalled with gladness the restoration and perpetuation of the independence of Hawai`i, but their happiness was mixed with feelings of distress because the right to independence had been snatched from their shoulders." He said, further, "Ke ku nei ke kanaka Hawaii me he kuewa la, aohe ona aina: The Hawaiian person stands as a homeless vagabond, one who has no land." The thieves of 1895-1896 not only deprived the Kanaka Maoli of a national holiday, they enacted laws that caused the loss of our language and the related loss of our own history. That process caused us to be deprived of even the memory of this national holiday. In our current process of de-occupying, we reject the occupier's holiday, and resurrect La Ku'oko'a instead. As a result of the recognition of Hawaiian independence the Hawaiian Kingdom entered into treaties with the major nations of the world and established over ninety legations and consulates in multiple seaports and cities. Celebrating our own holidays is one way to raise consciousness of a history that has been erased from the standard American textbooks and from the local Hawaii school system.…

Added by Pono Kealoha at 11:52am on November 30, 2010

2011 -

Hawaii's National Holiday celebration a success

ooths, a discussion tent, childrens' play area, food booth, booths of Hawaiian awareness issues, etc.   It was a beautiful day for such an event.   Parking was somewhat of a problem but people were able to find parking nearby and others used The Bus.   The original celebration was back in 1843 and a ten-day holiday was declared.  It was then that Kamehameha III coined the national motto: Ua mau ke ea o ka 'aina i ka pono; meaning: the sovereignty of the land (nation) is perserved in righteousness.  An errant subject of Great Britain, Adm. Paulette, ignored the Treaty of comity and navigation which recognized the sovereign independence of the Kingdom of Hawaii.  King Kamehameha III commissioned Minister Judd to go to England and protest the unlawful, belligerent occupation of Hawaii.  Admiral Thomas meanwhile hearing of this transgression immediately went to Hawaii to rectify the violation committed by one of its agent and removed him and his men from Hawaii and reaffirmed the recognition of independence and goodwill of Great Britain with the Kingdom of Hawaii.   Such an irascible and unlawful act was repeated by the U.S.A. on January 17, 1893; but instead of the U.S.A. doing the right thing, it decided to support the criminal acts of its agents and prolong its unlawful belligerrent occupation of Hawaii for national self- interest and its economic expansion.   Needless to say, it's a reminder of what is done right and what is done criminally wrong.  This pre-emptive invasion of U.S. troops on a friendly, neutral nation without cause is unjustifiable and internationally a war crime upheld by the United States of America.  It mocks justice, freedom, democracy, and morality.   On 31 May 1994, the U.S. sent out the Turpie Joint Resolution declaring that any other nation that intervenes on the Hawaii issue would be an unfriendly act against the U.S.A.  No nation wanted war with the U.S.; so they backed off and allowed the U.S. to continue its unlawful, belligerent occupation with its U.S. Puppet Provisional Government and ipso facto Republic of Hawaii.   Two attempts to ratify a Treaty of Annexation failed in the U.S. which couldn't muster the required 2/3rds majority vote; the U.S. employed the unlawful Newlands Resolution which is only legal within the U.S. and not in any foreign country.    The Hawaiian subjects' Ku'e Petitions signed by an overwhelming number of its citizens in 1897 spoke for the people against the illegal annexation to the U.S.A. which in the end was ignored.  Today the U.S. has the longest record of a belligerent occupation of another country; that being the Kingdom of Hawai'i.  It's high-time the U.S. does what is right and de-occupy Hawaii and honor its treaties with Hawaii.     The law of occupation and neutrality still apply for Hawaii.  It's time the U.S. pays the piper and put its money where its mouth is.   "Yankee go home!"  is a befitting remark as is NO ALOHA FOR THE  U.S.A.!…

Added by Tane at 8:25am on August 5, 2011

Added by John Kenolio at 8:23pm on January 16, 2011

Video: La Ku oko'a #2.

nd work of Timoteo Ha`alilio, a national hero, and to highlight the relationship of this Hawaiian Ali`i and Ambassador to His Majesty, King Kamehameha III." The original celebration of Hawaii's independence took place during the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1843, after England and France recognized Hawaii as a member of the European family of nations, and as an independent country equal to England, France, and the United States. The day continued to be an annual celebration from about 1844 to 1895, and for some years afterward, unofficially. La Ku`oko`a marks the day, November 28, 1843, that the Ali`i Timoteo Ha`alilio, sent as part of an envoy by King Kamehameha III, succeeded in obtaining the signatures of the authorities of Great Britain and France on a treaty recognizing Hawai`i as a sovereign nation. Ha`alilio, with the missionary William Richards along as his secretary, traveled through Mexico on foot and donkey to Washington D.C., where they met President John Tyler. Ha`alilio and Richards, armed with his agreement, then went on to Europe, to Belgium, Paris, and London, where the treaty was finally signed. They returned to the United States to cement U.S. agreement. On the journey home Ke Ali`i Timoteo Ha`alilio died, on December 3, 1844. The Treaty of Independence was a substantial achievement under international law, recognized by the government of the Kingdom through the official celebration of La Ku`oko`a. After the overthrow in 1893, the so-called Republic of Hawai`i government announced that November 28, 1895-a Thursday-would no longer be celebrated as La Ku`oko`a. Instead, Thanksgiving would become the official national holiday. The po`e aloha `aina-the thousands of Kanaka Maoli opposed to the illegal haole government-were incensed. They ignored the government's orders, and continued to hold celebrations of La Ku`oko`a. At those gatherings, they told the story of Ha`alilio's journey and significant achievement. James Kaulia of the Hui Aloha `Aina said that "the Kanaka Maoli recalled with gladness the restoration and perpetuation of the independence of Hawai`i, but their happiness was mixed with feelings of distress because the right to independence had been snatched from their shoulders." He said, further, "Ke ku nei ke kanaka Hawaii me he kuewa la, aohe ona aina: The Hawaiian person stands as a homeless vagabond, one who has no land." The thieves of 1895-1896 not only deprived the Kanaka Maoli of a national holiday, they enacted laws that caused the loss of our language and the related loss of our own history. That process caused us to be deprived of even the memory of this national holiday. In our current process of de-occupying, we reject the occupier's holiday, and resurrect La Ku'oko'a instead. As a result of the recognition of Hawaiian independence the Hawaiian Kingdom entered into treaties with the major nations of the world and established over ninety legations and consulates in multiple seaports and cities. Celebrating our own holidays is one way to raise consciousness of a history that has been erased from the standard American textbooks and from the local Hawaii school system.…

2014 -

National Holiday – Independence Day (November 28) | Hawaiian ...

hawaiiankingdom.org/blog/national-holiday-independence-day-november-28-2/

Nov 28, 2014 - National Holiday – Independence Day (November 28) ... celebrated as “Independence Day,” which in the Hawaiian language is “La Ku'oko'a.

Comment on: Topic 'Opposition to the Hawaiian Roll(s), etc. sent to U.S. Presid...

Hawaiian constitution. 2) The Hawaiian Kingdom claimed the following islands and their surrounding waters as its territory: Hawai'i, Maui, Lāna'i, Kaho'olawe, Moloka'i, O'ahu, Kaua'i, Ni'ihau, Lehua, Nihoa, Ka'ula, Laysan, Lisiansky, Palmyra, Ocean (Kure Atoll).  3) In 1843, the Hawaiian Kingdom received international recognition as an independent nation state from Great Britain and France. In 1844, the United States of America also recognized Hawaiian independence. 4) In 1854, King Kamehameha III declared the Hawaiian Kingdom a neutral state. 5) The 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom government was illegal. U.S. President Grover Cleveland stated, "[b]y an act of war, committed with the participation of a diplomatic representative of the United States and without authority of Congress, the [Hawaiian Kingdom] Government… has been overthrown. A substantial wrong has thus been done which a due regard for our national character as well as the rights of the injured people requires we should endeavor to repair." 6) According to a principle of international law, ex injuria jus non oritur ("unjust acts cannot create law"), the Republic of Hawai'i (1894-1898) was illegal; having been established by enemies of the Hawaiian Nation State following the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian government.  7) The Hawaiian Kingdom was never annexed by the United States of America. There exists no treaty of annexation. The U.S. had asserted its claim over Hawaiian territory through a joint-resolution of its Congress in 1898. The assertion of U.S. domestic law in an international affair is illegal, therefore the "Territory of Hawai'i," created by the U.S., was illegal. 8) The 1959 Hawai'i Statehood Admission Act under U.S. domestic law was an illegal act. The illegitimate "Territory of Hawai'i" was without legal capacity to transfer the territory of the Hawaiian Kingdom to the United States of America. As a result, the "state of Hawai'i" is also illegitimate. 9) An issue between the Hawaiian Kingdom and the United States of America cannot be resolved in U.S. courts. The proper jurisdiction for international claims is in an international court. 10) The Office of Hawaiian Affairs ("OHA") is an agency of the United States government. As such, OHA does not have legal authority to represent the sovereign interests of Hawaiians (both aboriginal and naturalized) who comprise the citizenship of the Hawaiian Kingdom. June 15 at 6:51am · Like · 2 Thomas Ah Yee Hinoi Mokiao Keoki, you are right, there is confusion out there. What makes it hard is that there are too many huis out their with there own agenda, each saying they are the right one. Each has its good points and each has something that just don't fit. The point is you have to know what you want. First thing, most everyone wants Independence, if that is what you want, then it's out there. Secondly and most importantly is which government do you want, there lies the division. Some want the Hawaiian Kingdom that was taken away from us. There are a lot who fear that government because they say it is a Monarchy. Yes it is but it is not the same type of monarchy that read about in history books. Ours was a Constitutional Monarchy, the people had a voice in that government. We lost our voices when it was taken away from us and became Republic of Hawaii, a Democratic Government. Today many Amricans don't even know what deomocracy is because that government is going through some changes that it dose not even resemble democracy. To understand what our Hawaiian Kingdom was you need to go back into its history. From there, you make your choice. June 15 at 7:04am · Like · 4 …

Added by Amelia Gora at 2:47am on June 17, 2014

National Holiday – Independence Day (November 28) | Hawaiian ...

hawaiiankingdom.org/blog/national-holiday-independence-day-november-28-2/

Nov 28, 2014 - National Holiday – Independence Day (November 28) ... celebrated as “Independence Day,” which in the Hawaiian language is “La Ku'oko'a.

 

LA KUOKOA NY - CELEBRATING HAWAII INDEPENDENCE DAY in ...

LA KUOKOA NY - CELEBRATING HAWAII INDEPENDENCE DAY on Nov 23, 2014 in Brooklyn, NY(New York City metro area) at Onomea. Join us in ...

 

2015 -

County Council recognizes Hawaiian Independence Day | Hawaii ...

hawaiitribune-herald.com/.../county-council-recognizes-hawaiian-independence-day

Oct 8, 2015 - The Hawaiian Kingdom's most important national holiday — La Kuokoa, or Independence Day — officially was recognized Wednesday by the ..

 

.

Hawaii's independence day : Hawaii - Reddit

Nov 29, 2015 - 5 posts - ‎3 authors

What did you see on TV that said its Hawaii's Independence Day OP? ... July 31st is KA LA HO'IHO'I EA - SOVEREIGNTY RESTORATION DAY.

Council Approves La Kuokoa Holiday Resolution | Big Island Now

bigislandnow.com/2015/10/08/council-approves-la-kuokoa-holiday-resolution/

Oct 8, 2015 - La Kuokoa was established in 1843 by King Kamehameha III. The day celebrates Hawai'i'sindependence, which has been recognized by ...

2016 -

E Kamakani Hou | La Kuʻokoʻa (Hawaiʻi's Independence Day)

Nov 16, 2016 - UH West Oʻahu will honor La Kuʻokoʻa – considered Hawaiʻiʻs Independence Day – by raising the Hawaiian flag at 9 a.m. on Monday, ...

 

Lā Kūʻokoa - Ka ʻAhahui Hawaiʻi Aloha ʻĀina - Hawaiian Patriotic ...

7 days ago - Lā Kūʻokoa 2016 - Hawaiian Independence Day. 11/18/ ... Independence Day on November 28 is the most important holiday in the Hawaiian ..

 

.

Join us Monday November 28, 2016 to celebrate La Kuokoa, with ceremony, food, education, T-shirt printing, concert. See flyer for details.



 

Image may contain: 1 person, text


Kukana Kama-Toth

Just getting into the steads and all I can smell is imu.... Hau'oli lā Ho'omaika'i kanaka☺️. But let us not forget about a veeeeeeery important day for Hawaiians. When I use the term "Hawaiian" in this context I am referring to the citizens of the Hawaiian Kingdom not the ethnicity.

This Saturday we will be celebrating Hawai'is Holiday. The day when we gained our own Independence. Come on down to Waimānalo and join us (Nā Kua'āina o Waimānalo) in celebrating Hawai'is Independence Day! Hau'oli lā Kū'oko'a!!!

Research incomplete.,

 

aloha.

  

 

 

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