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Limu gathers

Age five, gathering limu with Aunties were fond memories. Documentation to perserve memories and experience to share? Type of limu, place and how did you prepare limu, art laws, regulations, and kapu, would be helpful.

Location: Hawaiian Archipelago
Members: 2
Latest Activity: Mar 22, 2011

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Is limu gathering for human consumption abandon? Need documentation to prove not!

A university student from the Department of Botany wanted to know if we, Na Kanaka have abandon the practice of gathering limu? So I spent a few hours sharing with her the different areas on the…Continue

Started by Kaohi Mar 13, 2011.

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Comment by Kaohi on March 22, 2011 at 10:16pm

An article follow up:

 

 

Military retiree Simeti Lualemaga, convicted Wednesday by a jury at the federal court in Honolulu for assaulting last year in Tula an official with the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration will be sentenced in July.


After the verdict by the 12-member jury was read, each juror was polled on their decision, according to federal court records, which also state that the government moved immediately to detain Lualemaga, but was denied by U.S. District Court Judge David Alan Ezra.


Lualemaga, 67, remains out on bail and confined to a relative's home in Honolulu where he must wear a monitoring device. Ezra ordered new conditions for his release on bail following the verdict, in which the defendant must check-in 3 times a day with federal court Pretrial Services by phone, at times specified by Pretrial Services.


Lualemaga's attorney deputy federal public defender Alexander Silvert said sentencing is set for July 17 and once sentencing is done, the defense will file an appeal.


The defendant is looking at a maximum of 20 years in prison, but there is a possibility of a lower jail time, which is a determination made by the court, although both sides will submit sentencing recommendations.  (See Thursday's edition for more details of the jury's verdict and comments from prosecution and defense)


Comment by Kaohi on March 21, 2011 at 6:23pm

An article appeared on3/10/11 Hono Star-Adver.

 

Self-defense claimed in attack with machete

by Nelson Darancian ndaranciang@staradvertiser.com

     A 67-year-old decorated Amrican military veteran who lost his home in the 2009 Samoa earthquake was defending himself when he injured an NOAA employee with a machete during a dispute in Amercan Samoa over where he could rebuild his home, the man's lawyer said Tuesday in federal court.

     Simeti Lualemaga is on trail in U.S. District Court for the March 29, 2010, attack on Mark Cunningham, station chief for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration observatory on Tutuila island in American Samoa.

     The government says Cunningham had previously told Lualemaga he could not build his home on land that NOAA leases from  the area chief for its observatory.

     In opening statements to the jury, federal prosecutor Larry Butrick said the men got into an argument when Cunningham was out taking pictures of the property for his annual report.  Butrick said Cunningham was threatened to call police and that as he held his cellular telephone up to his ear, Lualemaga hit him with a machete.

    Cunningham lost the lower part of his left ear and suffered a laceration to his neck in the attack.

     Lualemaga's lawyer, Salina Althof, said Lualemaga doesn't dispute causing Cunningham's injuries.  But she said Cunningham started the fight, then lied about what happened. 

     Althof said the animosity between the two dates to 2006, when Cunningham became the station chief.  She said Lualemaga didn't like what Cunningham was doing to the land, asked NOAA to replace him and threatened to end the lease if he became chief.  She said Cunningham doesn't like Lualemaga and supported Lualemaga's opponent, who became chief in 2008.

     After the 2009 earthquake that destroyed his home, Lualemaga lived with his wife in a tent given to them by the Federal emergency Management Agency on land bordering the NOAA-leased property, and built a cooking shack across the border.  Althof said Lualemaga believed the land was under the control of a different chief, and got that chief's permission and government permit to build his home there.

Comment by Kaohi on March 19, 2011 at 1:44pm
We went to Uncle Mike Lee's limu gathering on the reef in front the Princess Kahanu Estates in Maili, it was wonderful.  We all learned so much about our beautiful limu beds.  Mike was a fantastic teacher and the limu was was plentiful with all kind different varieties too.  I am not ma'a to the Waianae Coast, therefore need to go with someone to the sea shore.  I did take pictures, but I need to learn how to embedd them on this site.  Sorry guys, kinda lolo.
Comment by Kaohi on March 19, 2011 at 1:40pm

Aloha mai kakou,
Sorry for the short notice, but I'm writing to invite everyone to a Reef Walk with Uncle Mike Lee this Saturday (March 19th). Meet between 8 and 8:30 at the beach park across from Princess Kahanu Estates. You can email lucy@hawaii.edu with questions.

In other news, we are on the hunt for Marti's copy of the Tropic Land Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). It was last seen at the awesome working meeting on March 4th. It is easy to recognize by all the colorful post-its sticking out of the pages. If anyone has it with them, please contact me at shelley@kahea.org

I hope everyone has a wonderful rest of the week--if you make it to the Reef Walk on Saturday, take lots of pictures to share! :)
Aloha,
Shelley

Comment by Kaohi on March 18, 2011 at 10:07pm

Aloha mai kakou,
Sorry for the short notice, but I'm writing to invite everyone to a Reef Walk with Uncle Mike Lee this Saturday (March 19th). Meet between 8 and 8:30 at the beach park across from Princess Kahanu Estates. You can email lucy@hawaii.edu with questions.

In other news, we are on the hunt for Marti's copy of the Tropic Land Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). It was last seen at the awesome working meeting on March 4th. It is easy to recognize by all the colorful post-its sticking out of the pages. If anyone has it with them, please contact me at shelley@kahea.org

I hope everyone has a wonderful rest of the week--if you make it to the Reef Walk on Saturday, take lots of pictures to share! :)
Aloha,
Shelley

Comment by Bronson Keali'i Kalipi on March 17, 2011 at 11:34pm
     Like I said, they can do something devistating and look what they doing to our Kupuna iwi.  Ambercrombie the zombie going snake his way on taking our islands away from the Kanaka's and our Nationals.  Uncle, use this as a vehicle so we can move as one.  I think Henry can lead us Kanaka's to the promise land IF again we let him.  So I not going to loose my focus on this matter cause our true problem is our people and there beliefs.  I believe in this process and believe that we the people can make a difference.  Uncle, we can disolve this Defactos Government if we come together as one period.  I need you as much as you need me, I need Kukuna O Ka La as much as he needs me.  We all need each other because we are as one.  No matter what color of our skins, we are all the same.  The difference between us and the defactos is that we are free and they want to break our freedom for there control.  That won't happen because our God E'O and Ke Akua are the same God we all pray to.  Our God is a sovereign God and gave us the same thing he have and that is the right to be free.  The people should have the authority not the Government.  They forced there way to become our government and that is full on bullshit.  I love my Queen Lili'okalani, she is our hero because she left that door open for us to decide and make a decision to come together to run the Kingdom again.  Because of what you think and what I think make this movement more complicated because the complication is the union of you and me.  We can never come together if we think different and believe in what we think.  That alone will bring seperation to our people.  I'm not blaming you nor my self,  it's all because of the triage america created for our people.  They did it to the Native Americans  and to our people the Kanaka Moli.  How can we call home HOME if we can't even get along with each other and idea's. We  always trying to pull each other down.  Uncle if I was forced to vote for you just because I wanted to see our people to move forward then I would vote for you.  The whole point of the matter is to see that we as the Kanaka Maoli's move forward.  If the Samoans, Tongans, Fijians, Tahitians, and other polynesians ethnicity can make decision and have the same beliefs, then why can't we?  Uncle Pomai, I respect your wisdom and heart, I believe in you cause your heart is rightous and your thinking is ALL PONO.  I learned that sometimes you have to bite your tongue just so you can get things to go your way.  The thing with that also is patience with the people, they won't see your point becuase there stuck on there's.  Why fight the current by going against it when you can flow with it without using up your energy.  I'm a kanaka that is trying hard to see our people get ahead with the struggle's and fight.  So Uncle, if I said something wrong in here, E kala mai, e kala mai ia'u, please for give me if I did so offended you in any way.    
Comment by Bronson Keali'i Kalipi on March 17, 2011 at 2:50am
Cool, I gather and culture Ogo.  We have fishponds that we use to grow the Ogo in.  My parents cultured Ogo for over twenty years.  Also we gather manuea, Kohu, Ele ele, Waiwae'iole, and Huluhuluweane which is also called Limu chop chop.  My mom uses that for all her raw fish before.  So now that we are having a hard time of finding it, we are now using Limu Kohu for all the raw fish.  So that is good that you are bringing this up cause we have to take care of the resources we have left if??? there's any left.
Comment by Kaohi on March 16, 2011 at 9:31pm

Lipoa

Limu wawae‘iole

Limu huluhuluwaena

Limu ‘ele‘ele

Limu manauea

Limu lipoa

Limu kala

Limu palahalaha

 

I'm actually looking for information, pictures and how we prepare for eating.  Small kine information just to prove or share with our younger generations the importance of this practice continue to be gathered and monitored. 

Comment by Kaohi on March 16, 2011 at 9:21pm

I'm new at starting my own group discussion, so please bear with me until I figure out how to bring information, experience and of course our on going limu beds on the Westside.  I have taken pictures and gathered some information, will continue to bring information to this site. 

 

The purpose is to share the true facts that we are still gathering and our limu beds are not for sale!  Which I suspect is whats already happening on paper.

 

 

Comment by Kaohi on March 16, 2011 at 9:17pm

A university student from the Department of Botany wanted to know if we, Na Kanaka have abandon the practice of gathering limu? So I spent a few hours sharing with her the different areas on the Waianae Coast that we gather limu for our eating practices. 
Introducing this student to my Kupuna was an exciting experience because she strummed on her ukelele and sang "Ka Uluwehi 'o Ke Kai" for her.  I then took her to the limu beds in Maili area where she met Bobby who was gathering wana for his mom.  He explained the nutritional values of limu.  Bobby is a careful gather'er because of the possibility of contamination.  As I explained to the student-- gathering is about being smart and conscious of how you gather.  Because of the many contaminates in the waterways.  It is still possible to gather and take home and consume it for ones palate. 
 
My mouth always water when I am near all types of limu.  Its because as a child my memory recollection begins at the early age of five, I was able to pick limu and eat it straight from the beach or shore area.  For me, eating limu on the beach was like a child in a candy store.

 

 

 

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