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Ke Ao Maoli

as a child i was chosen to have the oppurtunity to have had the Honor to be raised by my Na KUPUNA's of this Kingdom of Maui Nui.
mary pukui, described Kupuna as grandparent or ancestor. a few days ago i had a conversation with non-hawaiians that claimed to be Kupuna's. they had NO Kupuna relatives, NO ahupua'a, and NO raising of Kupuna's and definite NO Mana of a Kupuna and yet identifies themselves as Kupuna's.
They were from the mainland and what made them Kupuna's was their age over 50 years old.
my living Na Kupuna's taught me that a Kupuna, have had to be raised with the culture and traditions of our people the Kanaka Maoli's and most was raised from a very young age as myself.
Kupuna was defined as a native Hawaiian cultural traditional elder by my ancestors, that had deep knowledge of our history and lived the HA (breath of life) of their Ahupua'a.
however, there is a difference with being a Senior Citizen and identifing oneself as a Kupuna due to the age qualification. Being born and raised in hawaii does not qualify one as a Kupuna because of the age, but one who identifies one self as a Kupuna has the responsibility to teach the next generations to come of the culture and traditions of what was taught by our grandparents and ancestors.

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ALOHA Kakou, My Kupunawahinelani is Madeline Fernandez Brusco. My birth name is Henry Richard Kinney, Jr. I highly recommend that you share this information with your elders before you make any more comments on me.
Richard Pomaikaiokalani Kinney
mr, kinney,

for one if you feel this is intented to you than let it be, and as for my living Kupuna's this message is from them. just know who you are and where you belong, period!!! for you are not the only wanna be kupuna or wanna be kanaka maoli i have talked to and i'm sure you will not be the last.

many blessings to you and yours
mahalo Ke Akua
malama kou kino (take care of your body)..............................~da princess~
kupuna
n.

1. Grandparent, ancestor, relative or close friend of the grandparent's generation, grandaunt, granduncle. hoʻo.kupuna To take a person as a grandparent or grandaunt or granduncle because of affection; an adopted grandparent; to act as a grandparent. (PPN tupuna.)

2. Starting point, source; growing.

--------------------OR---------------
kūpuna
Plural of kupuna 1. Mai nā kūpuna mai, from the ancestors, traditional. Pili ma nā kūpuna, related through a common ancestor.

Those foreigners from US Mainland or elsewhere not rooted in Hawaii should be called MALIHINI.

mali.hini
nvs. Stranger, foreigner, newcomer, tourist, guest, company; one unfamiliar with a place or custom; new, unfamiliar, unusual, rare, introduced, of foreign origin; for the first time. Malihini mākaʻikaʻi, sight-seeing visitor, tourist. Akua malihini, foreign or non-native god [an appelation for Pele since she came from Kahiki]. Kaʻu malihini, my guest [cf. koʻu kamaʻāina]. Lāʻau malihini, non-native or introduced plant. Ka hele malihini ʻana mai kēia ao aku ā hiki i kēlā ao, the first trip from this world to the other world [translation of “Pilgrim's Progress”]. He mea malihini kēia i kuʻu maka, I've never seen that before; I've seen this rarely. hoʻo.mali.hini To be or act as a stranger, guest; to reveal that guests are coming, as by omens. Ke hoʻomalihini mai nei kahi moa a kākou, our chicken reveals that guests are coming.

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elderly
ʻĀoʻo, oʻo, makule.

person
Kanaka, mea, kama. Also: maka, kino; kaʻaka (slang); pelekona. Fig.: manu, ulua. Distinguished person, mea hanohano, ao loa. Beloved person, mea nui, lei hulu, lei ʻāʻī, hulu ʻaina ʻole, pua laha ʻole. First person, kino mua, kino kahi. Second person, kino lua. Third person, kino kolu. The person who, ka i, ke. This person, ia nei. Divine or godly person, mea akua. Unusual person, one of another race, mea ʻē. Person one thinks of constantly, pulakaumaka. Mature person, kanaka makua.
NOTE: In my opinion if they are not rooted in the islands from prior ancestors of kokok they should not be considered "distinguished" because it has a devine quality which goes hand in hand with the word KUPUNA we all grew up with.
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A FOREIGNER WITH NO ROOTS IN HAWAII COMING FROM OUTSIDE OF ISLAND SHOULD BE ADDRESSED AS A TUTU KANE/TUTU WAHINE IF A GRANDPARENT OR MAKULE MALIHINI. HOWEVER, IF THEY JOIN A SENIOR CITIZEN
ORGANIZED BY THE COUNTY (politically being correct) THEY ARE CONSIDERED NA KUPUNA OUT OF RESPECT AND DOES NOT HOLD A REVERED POSITION AS TO SOMEONE WHO IS ROOTED IN THE ISLANDS AND HAS ANCESTORS ROOTED HERE IN THE ISLANDS. THIS WAS A GOOD FORUM QUESTION BECAUSE WHEN I SPEAK OF MY KUPUNA FROM KOHALA THEY ARE "ROOTED HERE".

NOTE: Give them (those whom are not koko) a choice - a). tutu wahine/tutu kane b)makule malihini. And those of native blood but not hawaiian koko we can address them in their native tongue or call them Maoli Kupuna ie: native american, other pacific islanders, etc.

I am not prejudice, it's just plain common sense; we are a tradition, they did not have a tradition mirroring exactly what we did in our past and the struggles we went through in our past as koko. MAHALO FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE..

Me Ke Aloha Pumehana, Stephanie N. Naihe Laxton, Kohala, Moku 'o Keawe
Aloha Stephanie,

it is refreshing to finally hear the same cultural traditional teachings that i myself was brought up
with by my Kupuna Kahiko's (ancestors). it seems like the past 2 generations
for some ohana's has forgotten the widom and the sacred values that has not been taught by the generations before.
and they have missed the gift of learning the traditions not from books or what this system has defined as cultural.

One can not earn the right to be called a Kupuna just because of age and they now live on the 'aina.
You have to breathe the HA (breathe of life) and experience the ways of a Kanaka Maoli
and her cultural traditions of Hawaii Nei.
YOU HAVE TO LIVE IT---------- BREATHE IT--------TO CLAIM IT.............PERIOD!!!.............................~da princess~
Mahalo e da princess me Stephanie no ko mau olua manao. I'll have to share with many I know who are "fascinated" with Hawaii and think they can make some type of connection to the islands simply because they frequent the islands occasionally.
ALOHA KUU AINA HAWAII
KUU AINA ALOHA

AINA O KUU KUPUNA
AINA O KUU ALOHA

AUHEA WALE OE KUU IPO
PILI O KE AU MOE

E LAWE HIKI MAI E HOI
KUU AINA ALOHA

AUHEA WALE OE KUU IPO
HOA PILI O KE AU MOE

E LAWA HIKI MAI E HOI
KUU AINA ALOHA

HAINA IA MAI KAPU ANA
KUU AINA ALOHA
KUU AINA HAWAII

Words and Music by Madeline Fernandes Brusco
Leinaala Haili Recorded this Song as she knew my Grandmother.
please mr. kinney,

not all know the meaning to the song you typed
but again know who you are and where you belong

some may have the hawaiian language down
but still that does not qualify one to be a kupuna or a kanaka maoli

the language as well as the hula
with our rights, dignity, land, and water
has all been taken away from us the Kanaka Maoli's

but our MANA and ALOHA will never ever be stripped by a kanaka maoli
for again we are born with it in our souls and live it till we die.
only one difference, in our generation we voice our rights (being PONO)
loud and aggresively to all that turns a ear, we no longer will die
in silence as did our loyal Kupuna Kahiko (our ancestors).

may we continue to unite and see the glory of Justice for our sacred 'aina
and her people, the kanaka maoli's....................mahalo Ke Akua...................................~da princess~
e da princes, How can our people united when you continue to divide our people? Not only by Blood Quamtum but now also by the qualifications of a Kupuna? How can you expect me to see the glory of Justice that you speak of after your insulting remarks to Kekapukainohea of getting a Real Kupuna? I find your knowledge of a Kupuna to be HEWA. ALOHA KUU AINA HAWAII, o Pomaikaiokalani
OMG...IT'S TRADITION......KOKO (Blood) IS TIED TO LAND....WHERE THE HELL DOES ONE TIE TO LAND OF OLD IF THEY MOVED HERE FROM ANOTHER LAND? HELL-ERR! ISN'T THAT PLAIN ENOUGH? PEOPLE SEEM TO FORGET, THE TRADITION OF 1). who your family and 2). where they came from
THEN AND ONLY THEN IS A TITLE PROPERLY GIVEN IN HONOR AND RESPECT. GEOGRAPHY AND BLOODTIES GO HAND IN HAND WHEN IT COMES TO ALL THINGS HAWAIIAN
Madeline Juanita Fernandes father was John Jack Fernandes Johns mother was KiliKina Huihui pomaiokalani's great grandparents . from Waiahole .
Our Kupuna was cousin first cousin to Col. Oliver Kupau His mother was Our grandmothers Aunty Sarah Cullen who was married to Lowell Kupau.
ALOHA Kakou, I have placed the Burial Sites of six of my Ohana on Maoliworld. So that everyone in this Discussion can see and know who I am and most important who my Ohana are. I do this to protect my Ohana from any and all further comments questioning the qualifications of my Ohana. Richard Pomaikaiokalani Kinney
to be buried does not mean also where you are birth...where you are birth is where you come from, you don't come from where you die or buried.

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